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Interesting love story of Jodhaa, a Hindu Rajput princess and Jallalidin Mohammed Akbar, a Moghul prince. The script and acting are both excellent. Must see film.
This movie caputres the great ruler that akbar came to be during his era in quite a fasinating manner. Though one does feel the length factor creep in during the latter part. The relationship potrayed beteen akbar and jodhaa though still under scrutiny has shown to blossom.
This is the second Indian movie I've watched. The first one didn't make a good impression. And I expected the 2nd one would be better.

I spent around 50SGD for this movie( to catch the final show + food+ticket)
Anyway...I finally know what the 4-hour movie is really like.

People's minds seem to be so simple. They act without thinking. It's just so unlike the way we deal things in China.

But I like it. I like their clothing, the temple, palace, song, dance....love story(though too simple) But I like it. It arrouse my interest of visiting India. Well, I will visit one day.
Great effort from "Lagaan" director Ashutosh Gowariker though uneven in parts.
The subject is the controversial marriage between Mughal emperor Akbar and his Hindu wife (here hypothesised to be Jodhaa, princess of Amer).
While the sumptuous court scenes and romance were handled beautifully, the battles seemed too staged. Hritikh Roshan and Aishwariya Rai are compelling leads and it is evident that Roshan gave his all in the role.
Ila Arun is particularly potent as the deceptive Maham anga and some humour in the form of the eunuch and other courtiers alleviate the heavy subject matter somewhat. The chief villain Shariffudin is not as strong and I believe that an actor with greater stage presence should been cast.

Wonderful music as usual from A.R.Rahman. The sound editing though needed to be reconsidered in parts - the blaring histrionics should be toned down at times.

If you enjoyed Asoka or The Curse of the Golden Flower, you should enjoy this.


Somewhere under the ear-splitting choruses of zindabads and marhabas, Ashutosh Gowariker's Jodhaa Akbar is a beautiful (though never-ending) love story. Of two very beautiful people. But it is his attempt to explain the historical significance of the alliance-turned-amour that almost undoes the good work.
Just like in Lagaan, the core of Gowariker's period piece is a two-line concept. If his Oscar-nominated film was a fictional account of how a great freedom battle was won in an obscure Gujarati village in the 1890s, Jodhaa Akbar is a factual documentation of how a great love story got buried in the bloody pages of history.
That's perfectly fine, only that Gowariker takes three-and-a-half hours (yes, that's 210 minutes of your life!) and episode after episode of palace intrigue and fratricidal feuds before the Bachchan baritone can announce - just like in Lagaan - why the Jodhaa Akbar dastaan is worth recounting.
Another problem with the film, besides being way too long and very episodic in nature, is the lack of personalisation. Gowariker doesn't allow you to get inside the minds of either Akbar or Jodhaa. All you are left with is a much-bejewelled all-glam version of a slice of history.
Yes, there are tiny patches which give glimpses of the personal spaces of the title characters. Like in the Khwaja mere khwaja song when Akbar leaves his throne and indulges in a trance-like jig with the maulas. Or when he leaves his court midway, lured by and lost in the words of a bhajan. We just get a teaser of how his ambivalence towards religious faith defined Akbar's judicious decision-making. But there is not even a hint why in his later years he would oppose the alliance of Salim and Anarkali.
Above everything, what works for the film and what makes Jodhaa Akbar a must watch is the Hrithik-Ash romance. Chemistry? They say it best when they say nothing at all. Mashallah
Every scene featuring the two, especially the songs Jashn-e-bahaara and In lamhon ke daaman mein will go down in Bollywood history as some of the most poignant moments on Indian celluloid. The two don't kiss a la D:2 but there's enough for the Prateeksha party to blacklist the most beautiful man-woman pairing in Bollywood.
Individually too, Hrithik and Aishwarya come up with standout performances. It's not whether Hrithik has been able to walk and talk like Akbar; if Akbar had been documented, would he have been like Hrithik? To quote Gowariker, Hrithik was indeed "born to play Akbar"
It's one of the best movies in the history of the bollywood. Whatever you heard, just shoot it!! Go and watch the film. It's worth it.
:fresh: very very good movie with loads of fun....i couldn't leave my seat for a sec!!aishwarya has done a good job and hritik really should be awarded for the movie...overall the movie is 10/10
Jodhaa Akbar tells the untold love story between Jalaluddin Akbar, a Mughal emperor, and Jodhaa Bhai, a Rajput Princess.
Already having its flurry of advocates and adverseries, Jodhaa-Akbar generates enough controversy to build enough hype and hoopla for the audience to question when watching this lengthy epic. But instead of a period drama/romance fending its way into our hearts, what you get is nothing but another, unnecessarily lengthy bio-pic which is neither here nor there.
Director Ashutosh Gowariker is very good at giving his films that larger than life appeal, but amongst the many opulent sets and locations there is very little substance you can carry home.
Considering it's lack of historical accuracy, the writers of the film would've presumably diverted their attention to create as much chemistry between the two protagonists as possible. Alas, there is no chemistry between the two and the formal dialogues and mechanical movement of most of the characters could only make the matters worse. The film is neither accurate in its story and builds no heat between the characters at all.
It is clear that Ashutosh Gowariker wished to create a film which focuses on the romance as well as the history - but his shortcomings result in a film which is neither here nor there.
Most of the cast is very mechanical and the dialogues too self-expressive. Sometimes it is good for characters to portray their emotions through eyes and facial expressions - rather than saying dialogue. The actors don't even try to inject some thought or power into the emotionless dialogue - a downer as seasoned performances were something both audiences and critics would expect.
A.R. Rahman's music is seriously flawed. He is not in his element and what lets the film down is his cheesy, select few tracks of the score which take up most of the scenes. Only one song stands out for an acceptable listen at that is Jashn-e-Bahara.
The look of the film is perhaps the only thing which is a success. The sets are lavish, the locations are beautiful and the camerwork is genius. The actors look wonderful whilst being swathed in pearls and beads and Hrithik Roshan's costumes are a standout peice of artwork woven into material.
Aishwarya's performance is perhaps the best. She is the only one who injects some sort of emotion behind the dialogue and her expressions are also very natural. She is the scene-stealer, the highlight of the enterprise. Hrithik Roshan hams. Although he looks his part, the man is way too mechanical and his dialogue delivery is below-the-mark. Still, he handles the swordfights well. Sonu Sood is competent, but he could've done more justice to his meaty role.
Overall, Jodhaa Akbar is a film very much lost in its genres - creating no chemistry between its leading couple and hamming when it comes to the accuracy of events. It has a glossy look, but behind the glitter is nothing but a vaccuum of nothingness.
After Lagaan director A.G comes with this powerful movie wich is a real miracle
Aishwarya Rai & Hrithik Roshan are both bold & beutifull lovely
Ashutosh pays more attention to the sets then the story unlike his previous films but still is fun
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